Argumentative Essay…Pain and Loss…

Argumentative Essay…Pain and Loss…

The Knowing and Knowledge tutorial subject in week seven was as follows, “Life inevitably brings pain and loss. One will need to grieve for loved ones who are gone. All that is normal. What is abnormal is the increasingly common attitude that there is a ‘cure’ or ‘pill’ for every ‘problem’ that all suffering is somehow unnatural and not to be tolerated.”

This is a very broad and diverse issue, with two main sides to the argument, as well as many different opinions and ‘but’ questions and statements in the middle. The statement made by this person clearly defines their stance. Their opinion is that suffering over personal loss is normal, and it is unnatural to be using medications to cure ourselves of this par Continue reading

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POETRY AND POETICS – SHORT ESSAY

IN 800 WORDS, COMPARE AND CONTRAST SIR THOMAS WYATT’S “WHO SO LIST TO HOUNTE” WITH GWEN HARWOODS “OYSTER COVE”

It is difficult – some say impossible – to decipher the difference between poetry and prose. In the following essay I have attempted to analyse then compare and contrast two pieces of writing. I will class them poetry. The first thing I do when analysing poetry or prose is to read through the piece several times then translate it into ‘my’ language. This can prove quite difficult, but even harder is my second step of attempting to derive the underlying subtext Continue reading

Romance versus Realism – Essay

The following is an essay I wrote back in 2007 as a student at Victoria University. It’s semi-literary, so a little unlike my regular posts, but still something I put thought and effort into.

The reason I have posted this particular essay is to point out that I am not what I define as a ‘stuck-up’ reader. I like certain books for certain reasons, and I refuse to judge others based on what they choose to read.

I personally don’t think something has to be a ‘literary great’ to be considered a ‘real’ book. I believe people read for two main reasons; one, for entertainment – and escapism. And two, for education. These two things can overlap, but essentially each individual reads for their own reasons, and no-one should feel they are in a position to judge this. As a librarian, I see how many people borrow Mills and Boon and Western novels, and it is a lot. Some of these borrowers openly admit they know these stories are repetitive and predictable and some feel the need to justify this choice, by saying the balance them by also reading biographies and other more serious books, and calling them ‘easy’ and ‘fluffy’ reads. I always inform them I need no explanations, it is their choice to read what they want, and it is not up to me to make judgements.
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